Game Dev Tycoon Review

Game Dev Tycoon is the first video game developed by Greenheart Studios, and shows great promise. You take on the role of a game developer, reliving the early years of the gaming industry in your garage, upgrade to offices and beyond, and live in the modern day of gaming, and even beyond!

When you begin, you start off in a garage, and as a programmer, you will begin creating your first games during the early years of the gaming revolution. When you begin you create your company name, and name your avatar and choose basics customization options. Once you start, you can begin creating your first game. You will start off with 4 random game topics, and once you select your topic you will pick a genre (action, simulation, strategy, etc). Once you are happy with your selection, and select a console/computer to put it on, you will start the development process. Development of a game has 3 stages, with 3 sliders for each stage (for a total of 9). These stages will have options such as engine, graphics, level design, artificial intelligence, etc. Depending on the game topic and genre, certain combinations will value greater focus on certain subjects than others. For instance, Action games favor engine, graphics, and artificial intelligence for better review scores. Once you are done with your game the last phase is removing bugs from your game, and having a large number of bugs will hurt your score. When you are content with the bug removal and content to publish your game, you will soon receive a review score from 4 reviewers. Depending on how well made the game is, will ultimate affect your profits and sales.

Once done with the game you can generate a report, which will give you valuable information about the topic, genre, and how the system you select responds to the topic and genre. You will generate research points, which you can research new technologies and new topics, such as custom engines and so forth. You can also use research points to train yourself and your employees to better their technology, design, speed, and research skills. With high enough skill points in the fields, you can specialize them in certain fields, such as graphics, or artificial intelligence.

As you unlock new technologies, you can create your own custom game engine to better your games. As you upgrade to higher offices you can employ more workers, gain access to larger games, even access to research and development labs, and hardware labs to produce your very own gaming consoles! The game features a 35 year campaign which will last you several hours, and allows you to continue playing the current game after the game is over if you wish.

The tutorials provided help teach you enough of the game to help develop your games, but I feel a little more explanation could of been added, or additional tool-tips, but these are just minor suggestions to help make the game a bit better in my own opinion. Overall, I find the game enjoyable and if you are into the tycoon or business sim genre of games, I believe you will find a good deal of enjoyment from the game. For a first game from Greenheart games, I enjoy it and will look forward to future titles.

visit http://fatratgaming.com/eastsideshow/ for more Game Reviews and Tips and Tricks!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Stephen_Mcfarland/1451309

 

Video Game Tester Jobs Can Jump Start You on Almost Any Game Development Path

Video game QA testing may be low on the game development totem pole, just above “personal projects” you’d never think about including in your resume. But used correctly, both can carry you a long way towards becoming a game programmer, story line creator, or graphics designer.

It’s all about broader experience inventory and growth through progress.

It would seem fairly obvious. Look at anyone in college working towards a career in a high paying field like medicine, and what do you see them doing? That’s right, working at any job in a hospital, clinic, or private practice environment (a relevant environment) which they can find. They know even a role only loosely related to the one they aspire towards in their chosen field serves as a stepping stone towards more relevant positions once the opportunity becomes available.

As is the case in medicine, software development is a industry made up of many narrow roles. If you’re only focused on “qualifying for your desired role”, you may end up short changing yourself in two ways. First, by not recognizing applicable experience you’ve already obtained through non-professional work and personal hobbies. Second, by overlooking potential resume building opportunities while limiting yourself only to the ones not available to you.

Let’s look at the first problem: “not recognizing applicable experience you’ve already obtained”.

I don’t see this problem a lot in sales and marketing, regardless if it’s computer entertainment sales, advertisement sales, or used car sales. In fact, newer “greener” aspiring sales reps often need to learn a page from aspiring software developers about “Never put anything in your portfolio that someone wouldn’t pay you for”. Where the aspiring gaming professional falls short is recognizing what actually counts as valuable to those they present their resumes and portfolios to. They’ll often include what they consider “real job experience”, such as “Manager at Macy’s”, or “Audits and Accounting at Wells Fargo” (neither of which has anything to do with game or software development); but avoid including things like “my dorm mate and I wrote “Squares vs Circles” (an iPhone app) for fun while we were in college, it got 500,000 downloads within a month of release” (so what you are saying is, you wrote, developed, tested, and published popular and successful software on your own for fun?)

It’s as if those aspiring to game development roles almost seem to have an “inferiority complex” when it comes to the kinds of experiences relevant to the gaming field. While considering any work they think of as “from a real company” with “a real paycheck attached” automatically more important. The thing is: the person looking over your resume doesn’t care about any of that. They’re not your dad who thinks you should get a “real job”, or your mom who worries about you’re “spending too much time on the internet”, they are people looking for someone with experience that has to do with games. Don’t discount experience because it was “just a personal project”. If you want to be hired in the area of game development you need to show how you have already performed successfully in game development. Whether or not you got paid, and regardless whether or not it resembles what you or your peers think of as “a real company”, “real work”, or “real professional”. What matters is that it was developing a game, and you completed the project as defined – or better. That’s what people want to hear about.

Now take a look at the second problem: “overlooking potential resume building opportunities while limiting yourself only to the ones not available to you”.

This one is a little trickier, because it requires a balancing act. You see, another important thing to remember is “Build your portfolio around a single focus”. I’m not going into detail about that here, as it mostly goes beyond the scope of this article. But, it needs to be mentioned as it’s the other end of the spectrum in so far as: on one level, you don’t want to overlook potential resume building opportunities, but at the same time, you don’t want to build a portfolio of non-relevant experience and garbage either.

The best way to look at it is, if you have an opportunity to work in a position which is highly relevant to your desired role in gaming – say for example story line creator – by all means favor that work over work that’s less closely related. But when such positions are scarce or highly competitive, don’t overlook opportunity to work in any game development role – even if it falls outside the scope of the game development area you ultimately aspire towards.

The reality is, jobs in game development are places where many come – but few may enter. There simply aren’t enough positions to fill in any one role for everyone who applies at the door. And even experience outside the role you aspire towards can help you as it gives you familiarity, exposure to a variety of technology, and broader experience with the roles of others you might have to later work with.

The lowly and relatively low paying Video Game Tester Jobs.

Compared to other gaming industry roles, video game QA tester is the lowest paying. According to The Game Developers 12th Annual Salary Survey (conducted in 2013), freelance and temporary assignment video game QA testers, with less than 3 years’ experience, earn an average of $22,000/yr., roughly equivalent to $10/hr. – assuming a 40 hour work week. This is because of the much lower amount of education needed to enter video game QA testing.

However, consider those “working towards a career in a high paying field like medicine”, who I described at the beginning of this article; the ones taking “any job in a hospital, clinic, or private practice environment (a relevant environment)”. They’re doing this for a few good reasons. It helps to offset college costs, gives them a chance to gain experience and familiarization within a related work environment, and the jobs they take are often the “lower paying roles” due to lower entry-level education requirements – which equates to ease of entry. High turn-over rates as people in these positions attain the qualifications to move on to their desired careers, make these jobs readily available. And those who later move on to higher positions will have previous industry relevant experience to add to their resumes if needed. If needed being the key. If they don’t need it, or feel it would distract from experience more relevant to a particular job, they can always make less mention of it or leave it out entirely.

Which bring us to the real question – why are those seeking software development careers so averse to including video game tester jobs along the way? Think back about the “inferiority complex” among “those aspiring to game development roles” which I spoke of earlier. And the corresponding “superiority complex” among those becoming “material” for higher paying, more respected roles such as graphics designer or programmer. When people think of, for example, becoming an environmental art designer, they often think of highly sophisticated technical skills, and expensive but well-worth-it college degrees – leading to well-earned and well-respected salaries. When people think of a QA tester job, they often think of someone who was lucky enough to get paid to play games.

Video game quality assurance testing is seen by many as almost a kind of “red-headed-step-child”. Some treat it the same way one might treat a cheap book promising the secret to unbelievable income sold on a poorly done website alongside thin porn, payday loans, and mesothelioma related attorney services.

The reality is – a video game tester job can provide the same things to the soon to be 3D character model designer that a clerical position with a small clinic provides to the soon to be medical technician, nurse, or doctor. Video game tester jobs are readily available, industry related, work with which you can offset other costs while in school or training for your desired role, gain experience and familiarity with the software development process, and which comes with relatively low entry requirements.

Video game QA positions require only that you have a high aptitude for basic skills applicable to any job, such as attention to detail, ability to follow instructions, diligence, and being able to write reports. Yet they provide game industry experience, familiarity, and exposure to a wider variety of related technologies. Also, while QA testing may be “low paying” compared to other development roles, it’s actually on par with many part-time jobs that aren’t even career connected which people typically take while working towards their desired career path.

The key is, don’t look at QA tester work as a job you “don’t take seriously”, consider it instead as a useful tool in a strategic plan. Consider those too good to be true offers you see promising “$4,000 a month playing games” for some small monthly fee. These offers are usually made by assignment aggregators. Assignment aggregators are companies in the business of offering a central location for freelance video game QA testers to find temporary video game QA assignments. Whether the promises of easy money come true or not, you could use those to get work (resume experience) handed to you even though you have not yet attained any work history or qualifications, in addition to some extra income. What you really want is for the assignments to serve as documented work history in QA Testing to support obtaining a regular entry-level position with a gaming company. You want to be able to say “I’ve completed projects in the gaming field”… as opposed to the other applicant who hasn’t.

From here it depends on the options available to you, and your desired career path. If you’ve already chosen a career path in another game development role, then I’d recommend NOT moving all the way from freelance to full-time QA testing – as you want to focus your efforts on obtaining a job closer to your desired role. Until you do, you may wish to simply remain a freelance tester. Despite the lower hourly pay, this will give you the greatest flexibility and control over your time. Should you decide to become a regular part-time tester with a gaming company, the pay could actually outstrip many other non-career connected part-time jobs.

If you’re still deciding when it comes to what role you want to have in game development, you may want to consider that QA testing does become more lucrative with experience – all-be-it not as quickly as in other development roles. It rises to just under $40,000/year as a full-time job with 3 years’ experience, and “maxes out” around $70,000/yr. Not as much as the $85,000/yr. you could be making as a programmer, but still fairly decent compared to other professional roles.

Video game QA testing may be the lowest paid type of work in game development. However, those aspiring for such roles as game programmer, story line creator, or graphics designer would be wise to look beyond just work related to their desired role in game development.

Autumn Zajczerova is Head of IT/IS Research for Atlantic Magnolia Solutions. She first began “tinkering” with program code at the age of 8, and now has 26 years’ experience in computers and technology. Before she began playing video games herself in 1996 at the age of 16, Autumn was creating small, “generic 2D Graphics games” as novelties for peers who had access to computers.

Check out her latest website [http://www.autumnsvideogametesterjobscenter.com/] launched earlier this week about video game tester jobs.

Autumn has been researching and writing online for over 9 years. She is adept at spotting opportunity, fully assessing the pros and cons of choices in the job market, and she knows a good find when she sees it. You can see her most recent article on salary expectations for a video game tester located here [http://www.autumnsvideogametesterjobscenter.com/video-game-tester-salary.html].

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Autumn_Zajczerova/1914401

 

Video Game Tester Programs – Why They Are Great Programs for Some But Not for Others

Why video game tester job programs which make some people thousands of dollars leave others with a bad experience. And what determines when these programs are, and are not, right for you.

First, let’s look at hunting for a traditional job.

Take a step back and look at ways to seek traditional employment. There are different ways to look for work when searching for any job whether it be a secretary, sales representative, or plumber.

One way is do it yourself. Search on your own for job openings, write your own resumes, and visit each location (at the expense of gasoline or public transportation) to apply and attend interviews. At the end of the process you keep your full paycheck, pay no one else anything to get a job, and owe nothing to anyone once you have a job. This is the traditional way to obtain employment, and in many situations it’s still the best method today. One consideration if you collect unemployment benefits from a previous job, doing at least some of your job searching this way may be a requirement of the law where you live in order to not lose your unemployment benefits before finding a new job.

Another is work with a staffing agency or temporary employment agency. In this approach, they attempt to find employment for you from among hundreds of potential jobs. They may conduct your only interview or a small number of interviews, from which they gather the information needed to find the best matches for you among all the jobs in their database. They may also offer assistance in writing a master resume for their use, or a set of resumes from which they can select the best for each kind of job to submit to multiple companies.

Some agencies pay you, while charging the company needing workers both what you are owed and additional money to cover their fees. In this scenario, the agency is charging the business needing staff for providing workers as well as human resource management and other administrative services.

Alternatively, placement agencies and organizations which service freelancers may charge the job seeker: either a one-time fee per successful placement, or regular membership fees. One-time fees are more common among agencies providing permanent job placement, while membership fees are more common among providers of freelance work.

For example, freelance truckers can subscribe to services which give them access to hundreds of available shipping contracts they can select from. In this example, the agency aggregates and presents as many available contracts as possible to truckers for a fee; and leaves it up to the truckers to accept offers which best meet their personal, scheduling, and financial goals. Taxi drivers may have a similar arrangement with a dispatch agency which charges a regular fee for use of a branded name, the service of forwarding call-in customers to drivers, and possibly use of a vehicle specially equipped to serve as a taxi. Drivers in turn keep the money they collect from their passengers.

How are jobs as a video game tester different?
The answer is, they are not any different.

With game tester jobs your options are the same.

You can do it yourself. Using your own experience, education, and training you can seek employment entirely on your own for free. You can search for opportunities using your own effort just as with any other kind of job. Directly contacting companies like Blizzard, EA Software, Konami, Riot Games, and others on your own will only cost you in your own time and resources. All you need to do is compete directly with other possibly more experienced game testers; some of whom may already understand what hiring managers will be looking for, be familiar with these companies, and have a broader set of experiences to build their resumes and portfolios from. You won’t have to pay anyone to compete directly against other applicants who may be able to respond faster, with more powerful qualifications, and a better idea of what matters and what doesn’t to perspective employers.

Or, you could work with a video game tester job program. This arrangement works similar to the arrangement with staffing companies and freelance agencies for more traditional jobs.

In some arrangements, membership for the person seeking work is free. When this is the case, the game development company needing games tested is paying the company running the program to provide testers from a pool of applicants. You may, or may not, receive the same payment as when you work directly for the game development company. In either case, if your membership is free it’s because the game development company pays money to the program in addition to the money you receive. In exchange, the company operating the program handles human resources or other tasks – such as screening potential applicants and only selecting those they feel are best suited to the interests of the game development company. These companies do not charge you, because they charge the game development company and that’s who they work for – not you.

Other arrangements more closely resemble freelance agencies for taxi drivers, truckers, message specialists, beauticians, and so on. You pay a membership fee and in exchange you receive services, the most basic of which include making available to you as many jobs as you can qualify for. Others may include: helping you develop and present your resume, matching you with the best contracts, and managing your portfolio for you. You pay them, either a monthly fee or a percentage of what you make, and they are working for you – not the gaming company.

So, why are video game tester job programs great programs for some but not for others?
And, how do I know when such a program is right for me?

The main reason is mismatching between the game tester’s goals and objectives vs. a program’s services and benefits.

Experienced game testers often won’t benefit from a program, but could still benefit from books or other resources which some programs come with. They should check first if they could obtain the same books and resources on their own faster, at less cost, or both. A program would only benefit the experienced game tester if paying a fee just to get these kinds of resources would cost less in time and money than going out to find the same resources on their own.

If you’re a professional game tester and feel jobs offered through these programs are a step backwards for you, but you still don’t want to search on your own (maybe you average $11/hr. but could average $35/hr. if you had help being more competitive), you could always work with traditional staffing agencies. This is best if you are trying to move from an existing full-time game tester position to a better one, or are also open to other kinds of employment. The down side is they may poorly handle video game tester jobs unless they specialize in gaming. If your qualifications are strong enough, and your portfolio stands well on its own, using a traditional staffing agency is probably still your best choice if you’re serious about moving to a better game development position from one you already have.

If you’re new to game related jobs or the job market in general, then you probably would benefit from a program. College education programs are best if you seek degree training in the field. However, college programs seldom offer job placement at the end of the program. If you’re concerned about actually obtaining a job once you get your degree, you may want to augment your college education by participating in a freelance video game tester job program during your off-time from school. Augmenting your college education with time spent participating in a freelance program is probably the best bet for someone new to game development.

Another issue is the way these programs are marketed. Matching workers with jobs for a fee is older than the United States; however the video game industry only developed since the advent of the information age. As a result, agencies which match workers with traditional work generally promote themselves by describing their benefits in a strait forward way. There is no need to convince anyone on the concept of a traditional job; they simply need to inform people on reasons they may want to use a staffing service as opposed to seeking employment on their own.

By comparison, video game tester job programs need to promote both the concept of being a video game tester and the concept of using a freelance program to do so. This is sometimes done using persuasive language combined with the best examples of potential income which (while accurate) may not reflect the average tester’s typical results. Also some websites promoting these programs are not built by the company operating the program, but instead by 3rd party internet marketers who simply build a website using the most favorable and persuasive information before moving on to another site promoting a different product. It’s not that anyone is running a “scam” per se. The video game tester job program is in the business of matching potential testers with available work, while the affiliate webmaster is in the business of building as many websites for as many products as they can earn income promoting.

To make sure the website you’re reading gives you accurate, quality, information look for: citations from well-known game industry writers or trusted sources like Wikipedia, in-depth many paged articles, recently updated articles (indicating a site that’s maintained with the latest information), at least one page being older (an older terms of service or privacy policy shows the site has been around for a while), and so on. Affiliate sites with these characteristics are likely to be providing you information you can trust and make sound decisions on; and to advertise and market proven programs, even if other sites promoting the same programs use more generic sales tactics.

What if you are not interested in college or a permanent career, you just want some easy money.

If this is the case, you need to look at the kinds of assignments you choose once you sign up for a video game tester job program. Most programs offer consumer experience (CE, UX, or UXA) assignments as well as quality assurance (QA) assignments, even if their website talks mostly about QA. However, when selecting, applying for, and accepting assignments be sure to read carefully what the assignment entails and the requirements you must meet in order to get paid. QA offers generally pay a lot more, but QA assignments are not as easy and nowhere near as fun. QA testing is very tedious, can be frustrating at times, and requires a more committed mindset. Of course, if you see a QA offer which it looks like you’d enjoy doing (and it pays enough) don’t overlook it. Just understand QA assignments are not as easy as CE, UX, and UXA assignments – especially if your mindset is easy money. The upside to QA of course is that it pays more when you do fulfill all its requirements.

Autumn Zajczerova is Head of IT/IS Research for Atlantic Magnolia Solutions. At age 8 she began “experimenting” by altering computer code in simple programs, and today Autumn has over 26 years’ experience in computers and technology. Before she began playing video games herself in 1996 at the age of 16, Autumn was creating “small, generic, 2D Graphics games” as novelties for peers who had access to computers.

Autumn has been researching and writing online for over 9 years. She is adept at spotting opportunity, fully assessing the pros and cons of choices in the job market, and she knows a good find when she sees it.

Autumn discusses video game tester jobs on this site [http://www.autumnsvideogametesterjobscenter.com/] which she expands and updates regularly. In her most recent update, she added information specific to college students aspiring to enter the gaming field. Her latest article [http://www.autumnsvideogametesterjobscenter.com/qa-tester-during-college-1.html] discusses the synergy of using personal time invested into freelance video game tester jobs to augment a college education in game development.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Autumn_Zajczerova/1914401

 

TOP 5 Free Sites to Download Full Version Casual Games

According to VentureBeat mobile games are conquering the world. Hardly a surprise, huh? Nevertheless, PC casual gaming still exists and people all over the world still want to play casual games full version and free. Let’s put aside those sites asking you to sign up to get a game; showering ads on you; mentioning “free full download” to get you on the hook and download a trial version; and offering cracked games with potentially harmful viruses inside. Here is a list of nice websites that gives a wide berth to those actions.

Freegamepick.com

This casual gaming website lets you download about 400 free PC games with no time limits or trial versions, as well as play online games and mobile ones (yet selection is not that big with only 8 mobile games available). Games on freegamepick.com are allocated in such categories as time management, action, cards, hidden object, match 3, games for girls, shooting, and more. The portal make money generally on advertising, but it’s not annoying at all. The installation process is quite simple, just make sure to skip the offer to install additional software called “PlayFree browser” and that’s it. Game downloads are free of harmful viruses, adware, and spyware (scanned by Virustotal). Eventually, you won’t be interrupted by in-games ads. Each game page contains instructions how to install and uninstall the game for users’ convenience.

Myplaycity.com

MyPlayCity.com offers over 1000 free downloadable on PC and online games available in full version with no time limits. What’s more, this portal has a mobile version, so you can access myplaycity.com through a mobile device. Apart from this, exhaustive game reviews are being posted here permanently. Ads on the portal are a bit obtrusive, but still you can cope with it. The installation process is rather fast, just make sure to uncheck the boxes on the 1st step if you don’t want myplaycity.com become your default browser homepage or useless add-ons being added to your browser. Game downloads are free of harmful viruses, adware, and spyware (scanned by Virustotal).

Toomkygames.com

ToomkyGames exhilarates you with an enjoyable selection of about 400 eye-pleasing casual and flash games that are free to download on PC and play online. All the games are available in full version and have no time limits whatsoever. There are 19 categories to help you choose what game to play. What’s more, the catalogue is being constantly updated with free casual games. In addition, this portal has a mobile version, so you can access toomkygames.com through a mobile device and check out several popular mobile games. ToomkyGames generally makes money on advertising, thus ads on the portal are not abusive at all. The installation process consists of 2 parts: firstly, you’re optionally offered additional software which you can decline easily by pressing the appropriate button; after that, the game files are installed. It’s a bit longer than on the other websites, but games are definitely worth it. Game downloads are free of major harmful viruses and adware (scanned by Virustotal ). Eventually, you won’t be interrupted by in-games ads, too. Everything on the portal is made for user convenience.

Gametop.com

GameTop allows you to easily download full version PC games, as well as play games for Android, iOS, and Mac. All the content on this portal is free and contains no viruses, in-game ads, malware, and toolbars at all (scanned by Virustotal). Main categories are action, puzzle, racing, shooter, hidden objects, simulation, match 3, and arcade. You can also find a nice pick of online flash game in those categories. Gametop.com has the fastest installation process among all the sites in this review: no additional offers and clean installer. The portal make money generally on advertising, but it’s not annoying at all.

Myrealgames.com

This website is mainly focused on flash games, which are in the majority here. You can play them online and download on your PC for free as well. But still, there are over 200 free casual downloadable games along with about 70 mobile games. Games are presented full version with no ads inside. The advertising on the site itself is quite smooth. The catalogue is constantly being updated with fresh games and contains the heap of genres like action, kids games, bubble shooter, dress up, platform games, etc. The installation process is the same as on Gametop – fast and easy. Game downloads are virus free, with no adware or spyware at all (scanned by Virus Total).

To sum everything up, I’d like to point out that while one game from every website has been downloaded and checked by me personally via VirusTotal, I’d still advise you to have a firewall activated, as well as any type of anti-virus software installed on your PC. Malwarebytes Corporation has a handy program for you to monitor and detect any malicious activity on your device. Free version can be downloaded right from their official website. Another point is how to check if the game is really full version. Well, everything depends on you and how thorough you scan a game downloading page with your own eyes. Read carefully each sentence focusing on those ones that are written in lowercase. Yeah, it could be quite tedious, but still you’ll have an idea whether the game is trial or full version.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/John_C_Button/1392054

 

Video Game Tester: Is It A Real Job Or Just Too Good To Be True?

You should not let the title ‘video game tester’ fool you into thinking that this is not a job but the chance to be paid to do what you love the most. While it is true that video game testers have a lot of fun playing the games that they fell in love with at a young age, it is also a very serious job.

Gaming companies use video game testers to ensure that the products they are about to release into the market have no issues. A video game riddled with bugs and errors will definitely put people off. As such, the job of being a video game tester, also known as a quality assurance tester, is very important and comes with a host of responsibilities. The good news is that the job also comes with many benefits that you can enjoy while playing your favorite video games.

Some of the responsibilities of a video game tester include:

1) Finding bugs and errors in the game
This is one of the primary responsibilities of being a video game tester. You need to play the game over and over again (and in different combinations) so as to ensure that there are no bugs that will interfere with the functionality of the game. There are databases and protocols put in place by the gaming company to ensure that you will be able to report any discovered bugs to the game developers.

You will often find that the company will evaluate your performance based on the number of bugs that you will be able to spot. It is not enough to find the bugs in the software. You also have to be able to reproduce the bug several times, so as to show that it is of sufficient concern to be looked at. When a gaming company is developing a game, it is usually on a tight schedule. This means that it will only consider serious bugs that will disrupt the progress of the game and ruin the experience for users.

2) Testing the limitations of the game
As a video game tester, you will also be tasked with the responsibility of finding out the craziest and strangest things that users will be capable of doing with the game in question. Some players might want to go to the farthest point on the map in the game. Others might want to create the largest possible army in the game. It is your role to find out if the game can handle the stress of such anomalies. If it cannot, then you should quickly make your report to the game developers.

3) You have the responsibility of making the sure that the game can be beaten
It is also important to find out whether the game can be beaten or not. Releasing an unbeatable game into the market will only frustrate interested gamers. They only want to be challenged hard enough that they have to exert themselves a lot to win. However, they still want to win in the end. It is your role to find out if this can actually happen.

Some of the benefits that you stand to enjoy as a video game tester include being able to play games that have not yet been released. You also get the chance to have a comprehensive list of cheat codes for a particular game. The biggest benefit is that you will be paid for something that you are very comfortable with and happy doing.

Being a video game tester is not all fun and games, but if you’re up for the job it might just be the coolest one you ever have.

Apply to become a video game tester today! [http://www.playgames4cash.com]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/David_D_Sullivan/1959997